Accueil » 3 questions to David Eloy, editor-in-chief of the magazine Altermondes
Published on 01/04/2015

3 questions to David Eloy, editor-in-chief of the magazine Altermondes

For 10 years the magazine Altermondes, which is published quarterly, has been looking at international issues from the angles of solidarity, sustainable development and human rights. Last year, Altermondes became the first press organ to be edited by a société coopérative d’intérêt collectif (Scic – cooperative community-oriented enterprise), of which GRET is a member, as well as being a member of the magazine’s editorial board. As the first anniversary of the enterprise’s being set up is currently under way, we hand over to the editor-in-chief. 

In Touch: What is Altermondes and what does it bring the reader that other media do not?

David Eloy : Altermondes, is first and foremost a medium created ten years ago by a group of associations that were no longer happy with the way international news and civil society stakeholders were dealt with in the media we might call “conventional”. Following the example of Courrier international, which suggests looking at the world through the eyes of the foreign press, Altermondes – in its quarterly magazine and on its Web  site – puts forward the idea of understanding the world through the perspective of those who see it differently, who each day on the ground resist and offer alternative suggestions and solutions. In this sense, its editorial line is clearly out of touch with that of other media relaying international news. But Altermondes is also a one-of-its kind experience in the press world: a media carried by a cooperative whose members are as much journalists as they are readers and civil society organisations such as GRET.

In Touch: How do you choose the subjects Altermondes looks into?

David Eloy : Altermondes, is first and foremost a medium created ten years ago by a group of associations that were no longer happy with the way international news and civil society stakeholders were dealt with in the media we might call “conventional”. Following the example of Courrier international, which suggests looking at the world through the eyes of the foreign press, Altermondes – in its quarterly magazine and on its Web  site – puts forward the idea of understanding the world through the perspective of those who see it differently, who each day on the ground resist and offer alternative suggestions and solutions. In this sense, its editorial line is clearly out of touch with that of other media relaying international news. But Altermondes is also a one-of-its kind experience in the press world: a media carried by a cooperative whose members are as much journalists as they are readers and civil society organisations such as GRET.

In Touch: Why subscribe to Altermondes?

David Eloy : Freedom of expression, just like the right to be informed, are fundamental legal rights in our democratic societies. The attacks on Charlie Hebdo were a cruel reminder to us of that. The media are essential to a working democracy. This is why we can assert that the existence of good-quality independent media is a collective responsibility. If the subscribers don’t guarantee the existence of such and such a newspaper or magazine, who will other than advertisers? The press therefore needs support. All the more so when it chooses – as is the case with Altermondes – to take up subjects such as international solidarity and development which are spurned by most media, and to enable civil society stakeholders in both rich and poor and underdeveloped countries to be heard. This is the void that Altermondes has come to fill.

The Web site : http://www.altermondes.org/