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Are intervention methods and systems used by agroecology advocates pertinent and effective ?

Lessons drawn from the CALAO study in west Africa


Agroecology being diverse and multidimensional, a broad range of issues were addressed such as the fundamental role of crop biodiversity, the highly preoccupying status of agrochemical use in the region, the need for appropriate-scale machinery, the importance of innovative and  participatory intervention mechanisms, the recognition and integration of Indigenous Knowledge, the capacity building of the new generation, the marketing of agroecological products…

Three main take home messages emerged from all the discussions:

– The importance to invest in Soil Health and Farmer Empowerment,

– The necessity to seek convergence between Land Tenure & Agroecology and co-produce a credible narrative for a smallholder pathway towards agricultural development,

– The challenge posed by commodities-based production systems to an agroecological transition.

 


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